FAQ

Click the link below to read the FAQ.

What Is Dog Agility?
How Do I Start?
How Do I Become a Member?
How Do I Book A Course?
What Are The Rules?
What About Vaccination?
Is My Dog Fat?
Where To Now?


What Is Dog Agility?
Agility is similar to Horse Show Jumping. It is a sequence of obstacles (including, but not limited to: hurdles, tunnels, dog-walks, A-frames and weave poles) which the dog learns to negotiate without errors against the clock. The dog that completes the obstacles correctly within the time set will achieve a “Clear Round”. The winner is the quickest of these dogs.

Of course not everyone who trains their dog for agility competes. It is a great way to enjoy time with your dog whilst developing your relationship with your dog. Agility provides plenty of exercise and mental stimulation for your dog helping to alleviate bad habits that are created through boredom.

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How Do I Start?
The best place to start with Dog Agility is to find a club near you. Please check the ADAA website for some of the clubs in Queensland and NSW.

Then you might go along and see how it all works, talk to the other owners and instructors, and get a feel for what’s involved. You can apply to be a member of the club, and apply for a training course. We help you choose the right course for you and your dog.

And as they say from the top of the A-Frame… it’s all down hill from there!

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How Do I Become A Member?
To become a member, simply email adcqld@gmail.com and we will send you a copy, which you can post to the address on the form along with the appropriate fees!

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How Do I Book A Course?
To book a course, please email adcqld@gmail.com asking for an application form for the class you are interested in and a membership application form and pay the appropriate fees by posting to the address on forms.  You will then be notified if you have been accepted into the class as there are a limited number of dogs in each course.

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What Are The Rules?
To find out what ADCQ’s rules and regulations are. To be updated soon 🙂

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What About Vaccination?
The club requires your dog to be up to date with its yearly vaccinations. We recommend a C5 vaccine as this vaccine is the best available.

The C5 vaccine covers Canine Distemper, Hepatitis, Canine Parvovirus, Canine Parainfluenza and Bordetella. These diseases/viruses are highly contagious and the club policy is that if your dog has been in contact with another animal with one of these diseases, your dog is not permitted at the training grounds for 14 days post contact. This is to reduce the risk of spreading these diseases to other member’s dogs.

The club requirement is that a minimum C3 be administrated or proof of Titre testing.  Do take the advice of your Veterinary Surgeon.
We require proof of vaccination either a photocopy or by siting the original.

Kennel Cough

We follow the guidelines set down by ADAA re the quarantining of any dog that currently has kennel cough or been near any dogs that have it. Please refer to this PDF for more information.

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Is My Dog Fat?
Can you feel your dog’s ribs without applying heavy pressure? Does your dog have a waistline? Can your dog sustain long periods of normal dog activity without panting heavily and having to stop often? If you have answered no to one or all of these questions your dog may be overweight. Agility is a highly active sport and as such your dog should be in a lean and fit condition. Excess weight on your dog can cause undue stress on the bones, joints and ligaments. A happy and healthy backyard dog is different to an athletic agility dog. Please don’t be offended if a senior instructor suggests your dog should lose some weight, they are not out to upset you, they have only your dog’s health in mind.

So What Do I Do?

First thing is, write down on a piece of paper everything your dog is fed, including all the little tit-bits and training treats. Next you have to stop feeding your dog this amount, so try reducing the intake by ¼ for about 1 month. If there is no decrease in weight, reduce by another ¼. You don’t want your dog to loose more than 1kg per week. Gradual weight loss is the best for your dog. Try to also increase (again gradually) your dogs exercise time. Instead of walking for ½ hour each day, increase it to 45mins, you will benefit as much as your dog. There are special diet foods available from your veterinarian. These foods are designed to reduce your dog’s weight without having to reduce the amount you feed. Remember if your dog loses weight rapidly or you have problems reducing your dog’s weight consult your friendly veterinarian.

Please note: ADCQ are not Veterinarians. This is meant as common sense advice only. It is recommended to seek proper medical attention before attempting any weight loss program.

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Where To Now?
So you have successfully completed the Basic Training. Where to next? The Agility Foundations Course followed by the Beginner Handling Course awaits you and so does the competition arena, if that’s what you would like to do. Hopefully the next few paragraphs will explain your options and the transition in a clear manner.

Agility Foundations Course

The Agility Foundations Course works on all of the key foundation training that will get dog and handler heading in the right direction.  The course completion/graduation assessment includes a straight jump grid, single jump plus also tunnel, but most importantly focuses on relationship between handler and dog and core skills to be able to progress in your Agility journey.

PREREQUISITE – Your dog needs to be under control whilst on lead, and you are able to reward your dog (with food or toy/play).

Beginner Handling Course

This course will continue building PNU work learned in the Agility Foundations Course but move onto short sequences with jumps and tunnels.   Weeks seven and eight will focus on training/building skills for weave poles and contact equipment. Graduation test for the handling component comprises a simple (ie elementary) jumping course (week six).

PREREQUISITE – You need to have successfully completed the Agility Foundations Course graduation ‘test’.

Competition Class and Skills Practice 

Competition Class will have sequences and courses catering for beginners to open sequences.  Skills Practice will be equipment available for members to work on specific skills.  Sequences will be instructed however in lieu of running a sequence, you may request the instructor to help you with a skill you are working on.

PREREQUISITE – You need to have successfully completed the Beginner Handling Course graduation ‘test’.

Competition.

Now you will be ready to start coming along to competitions.    You must become a member of ADAA to compete.(see below)

ADAA.

Agility Dog Association of Australia Ltd. The club is affiliated with ADAA and conducts competitions under the rules and guidelines of ADAA. ADAA is solely dedicated to the promotion of agility. There are four levels of competition. Of which I suggest, for a first attempt at a competition, the following levels: Elementary and Starters agility. These courses are of simple design, purely to ensure that you and your dog can run about 16 to 20 obstacles in one go. Advanced dogs are not allowed to enter these events. It does not include seesaws or spread jumps. Elementary does not include weave poles and Starters has relaxed rules about performing the poles. Novice jumping is also a good event for agility newcomers; although the courses can sometimes be a little complex, there are no contact obstacles (A-Frame, seesaw, dog walk).

If you want to compete then you will need to join ADAA, as this is a separate entity to the club.

Competitions are held regularly around South-East Queensland , many right here at the training grounds.

Entry fees are quite reasonable. Information about Upcoming Competitions can be found via:

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